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Books of Thought

Austrian economics, freedom, heathenry, and maybe the occasional rant.

When people think that they would be able to stop the government from taking their guns

lee-enfeel:

whatshouldwecallconservatives:

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Libya, 2011-2013.

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Vietnam, 1955-1975.

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Afghanistan, 2001 - Ongoing.

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France, 1940-1945.

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Afghanistan, 1979-1989.

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Cuba, 1953-1959.

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Tanks, aircraft, helicopters, and drones all have crew and logistical demands. Tanks are worthless in urban environments, helicopters are vulnerable to small arms fire, aircraft risk significant collateral damage, and drones use sensitive electronics. Insurgencies are not stand-up fights between standing armies, they are guerrilla wars that cannot be easily fought be conventional armies with conventional weapons and conventional tactics. The Soviets lost in Afghanistan. NATO is losing in Afghanistan. The current Afghan insurgency is not even half as organized as it was under Ahmad Shah Massoud during the 1980s. Drones, helicopters, and tanks are not what win wars. They cannot kick in doors to conduct searches. They cannot patrol city blocks, or crack down on protests. That requires men.

Bullets kill men.

Asymmetrical warfare is a concept that is beyond a lot of people.

Afghanistan isn’t called “the grave of empires” because it has the toughest tanks, or the biggest army, or the most powerful air force. It’s called that because empires believe their large conventional armies are able to defeat insurgencies in Afghanistan. Since 1842, the Afghans have been proving them wrong.

gunsknivesgear:

Glock does one thing particularly well - keep on running.
I’ve just had 5,000 rounds through my latest one, with absolutely no failures. No FTEs, FTFs, or any other malfunctions of any kind.  That’s why my primary carry gun is a Glock.
I cannot trust my life to a gun that has less than total reliability.

Aside from blowback pistols like the Bersa Thunder 380 and the good old-fashioned Makarov, the Glock 19 would probably be my primary carry gun if I could CCW. Stupid Firearms Act…

gunsknivesgear:

Glock does one thing particularly well - keep on running.

I’ve just had 5,000 rounds through my latest one, with absolutely no failures. No FTEs, FTFs, or any other malfunctions of any kind.  That’s why my primary carry gun is a Glock.

I cannot trust my life to a gun that has less than total reliability.

Aside from blowback pistols like the Bersa Thunder 380 and the good old-fashioned Makarov, the Glock 19 would probably be my primary carry gun if I could CCW. Stupid Firearms Act

US “suspected terrorist” database had 1.5M names added to it in past 5 years

priceofliberty:

finepoints:

mostlysignssomeportents:

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The scale of the secret blacklist was revealed in a civil suit over the Terrorist Screening Database, and it shocked the judge.

Read more….

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We’re probably all on it, simply for being against the welfare-warfare state.

thinksquad:

Iceland’s citizens were given a chance to help forge a new constitution for their country through Facebook and Twitter, so it’s not surprising that they backed the resulting draft. Now it’s over to the politicians.

Here’s a quick run-down of the background to all this. Iceland’s banking system collapsed right at the start of the financial crisis, taking the country’s government with it. The new leadership decided to go the open route, not least because secretive dealings were largely to blame for the banking fiasco.
There were two technologically interesting spinoffs of this situation. One was the creation of the Modern Media Initiative (now the International Modern Media Institute), a Wikileaks-inspired free speech drive – the idea here is to turn Iceland into an haven for free speech by inviting media organizations from around the world to host their sites in Iceland’s green data centers and enjoy the country’s strong new protections for whistleblowers and the like.
The other was the constitutional crowdsourcing. Iceland’s old constitution was based on that of former master Denmark and was seen as out-of-date, so 25 citizens were brought into into a Constitutional Council to help create a new one. The council took the ideas raised online by their fellow citizens and delivered the resulting draft in July last year. It took a while to ask the voting public at large what it thought of the result, but Iceland now has its answer to that question.


http://gigaom.com/2012/10/22/icelanders-approve-their-crowdsourced-constitution/

This is actually rather cool. I’d like to know what’s in the draft, though, since it could be a lot of “take that guy’s property so I can get free stuff”…

thinksquad:

Iceland’s citizens were given a chance to help forge a new constitution for their country through Facebook and Twitter, so it’s not surprising that they backed the resulting draft. Now it’s over to the politicians.

Here’s a quick run-down of the background to all this. Iceland’s banking system collapsed right at the start of the financial crisis, taking the country’s government with it. The new leadership decided to go the open route, not least because secretive dealings were largely to blame for the banking fiasco.
There were two technologically interesting spinoffs of this situation. One was the creation of the Modern Media Initiative (now the International Modern Media Institute), a Wikileaks-inspired free speech drive – the idea here is to turn Iceland into an haven for free speech by inviting media organizations from around the world to host their sites in Iceland’s green data centers and enjoy the country’s strong new protections for whistleblowers and the like.
The other was the constitutional crowdsourcing. Iceland’s old constitution was based on that of former master Denmark and was seen as out-of-date, so 25 citizens were brought into into a Constitutional Council to help create a new one. The council took the ideas raised online by their fellow citizens and delivered the resulting draft in July last year. It took a while to ask the voting public at large what it thought of the result, but Iceland now has its answer to that question.


http://gigaom.com/2012/10/22/icelanders-approve-their-crowdsourced-constitution/

This is actually rather cool. I’d like to know what’s in the draft, though, since it could be a lot of “take that guy’s property so I can get free stuff”…

thinksquad:

Iceland’s citizens were given a chance to help forge a new constitution for their country through Facebook and Twitter, so it’s not surprising that they backed the resulting draft. Now it’s over to the politicians.
Here’s a quick run-down of the background to all this. Iceland’s banking system collapsed right at the start of the financial crisis, taking the country’s government with it. The new leadership decided to go the open route, not least because secretive dealings were largely to blame for the banking fiasco.

There were two technologically interesting spinoffs of this situation. One was the creation of the Modern Media Initiative (now the International Modern Media Institute), a Wikileaks-inspired free speech drive – the idea here is to turn Iceland into an haven for free speech by inviting media organizations from around the world to host their sites in Iceland’s green data centers and enjoy the country’s strong new protections for whistleblowers and the like.

The other was the constitutional crowdsourcing. Iceland’s old constitution was based on that of former master Denmark and was seen as out-of-date, so 25 citizens were brought into into a Constitutional Council to help create a new one. The council took the ideas raised online by their fellow citizens and delivered the resulting draft in July last year. It took a while to ask the voting public at large what it thought of the result, but Iceland now has its answer to that question.

http://gigaom.com/2012/10/22/icelanders-approve-their-crowdsourced-constitution/

This is actually rather cool. I’d like to know what’s in the draft, though, since it could be a lot of “take that guy’s property so I can get free stuff”…

johnmosesbrowningvevo:

sapper-in-the-wire:

johnmosesbrowningvevo:

sapper-in-the-wire:

only one of these is ballinand one of these is much less of a war criminal than the others

Hey now, we don’t know exactly what Putin did in the KGB. He could’ve filed papers, for all we know.
Also, does he age?
At all?

yeah paper airplanes that ASSASSINATED PEOPLEputin does not age due to his daily intake of polonium, which, under stress, can be excreted through the pores of his skin, making his handshakes deadly, as was shown during the assassination of Alexander Litvinenko

SO THAT’S HOW THE PLANE WITH THE POLISH PRESIDENT CRASHED

I think Putin avoids aging because he’s secretly in possession of the Ruling Ring of Sauron. It’s probably also why nobody seems able to remove him from power.

johnmosesbrowningvevo:

sapper-in-the-wire:

johnmosesbrowningvevo:

sapper-in-the-wire:

only one of these is ballin

and one of these is much less of a war criminal than the others

Hey now, we don’t know exactly what Putin did in the KGB. He could’ve filed papers, for all we know.

Also, does he age?

At all?

yeah paper airplanes that ASSASSINATED PEOPLE

putin does not age due to his daily intake of polonium, which, under stress, can be excreted through the pores of his skin, making his handshakes deadly, as was shown during the assassination of Alexander Litvinenko

SO THAT’S HOW THE PLANE WITH THE POLISH PRESIDENT CRASHED

I think Putin avoids aging because he’s secretly in possession of the Ruling Ring of Sauron. It’s probably also why nobody seems able to remove him from power.

Thought for the Day:

imperialthoughtoftheday:

Humanity can never fall, for both victory and failure only serve to strengthen our resolve.

We should all remember this in the years to come.

thinksquad:

Justice League of America #17

thinksquad:

Justice League of America #17

blue-eyed-devil-88:

The Kingdom of the Angles in Scotland  The Angles were Germanic invaders who came from the Danish-German border and conquered most of Roman Britannia, giving the country its later name, England (Angle land), and dividing it up into seven kingdoms. Ida was the warlord who carved out the northern-most Anglian kingdom, Bernicia, north of Hadrian’s Wall, in the fertile farmlands around the River Twe…ed. This led to a struggle over territory in the 6th and 7th centuries with the Britons, who were based at Dumbarton on the River Clyde. It was a struggle that the Britons seemed to lose. Angle power was in the ascendant. In 603 they defeated Aedan, Gaelic King of Dál Riata, at the battle of Degsastan. In 638 the Bernicians took Edinburgh from the Britons, but greater success followed under their great warlord Oswui (641 – 670). In a series of campaigns Oswui conquered Dumfriesshire, Galloway, Kyle and the Lothians. To the south he took the Angle kingdom of Deira, that covered Yorkshire, and forged a new kingdom – Northumbria. So great was Oswui’s power that both the Picts and the Gaels recognised his overlordship. Only after the Picts defeated the Angles at Dun Nechtain (Dunnichen) in 685 AD did Northumbrian expansion halt and their overlordship was finally broken. The power of the Angles was smashed in 867 AD when the Vikings, under Ivarr and Halfdan, took York. All of Northumbria south of the Tyne was lost. The Angles barely held on in Bamburgh, their kingly status reduced to that of an Earl. Soon the Angles, with their power depleted, looked to the new kings of Alba, like Constantine II, for protection from the Vikings in York. In 954 Illuib, King Constantine’s son, captured Edinburgh, and Anglian power finally crumbled in Scotland when Malcolm II defeated the Northumbrians at the Battle of Carham in 1018 – taking the Scottish frontier to the Tweed. Later Earls still played a part in Scottish history. Earl Siward helped Malcolm Canmore drive Macbeth from the kingship of Alba at the Battle of Dunsinnan – Macbeth didn’t actually die there, as is related in Shakespeare’s play, but died three years later at Lumphanan in Aberdeenshire at the hands of Malcolm Canmore. After the Norman conquest of England, the last Anglian Earl of Northumbria decided Scotland was a safer option than England and fled to Malcolm’s court for sanctuary.

blue-eyed-devil-88:

The Kingdom of the Angles in Scotland

The Angles were Germanic invaders who came from the Danish-German border and conquered most of Roman Britannia, giving the country its later name, England (Angle land), and dividing it up into seven kingdoms.

Ida was the warlord who carved out the northern-most Anglian kingdom, Bernicia, north of Hadrian’s Wall, in the fertile farmlands around the River Tweed. This led to a struggle over territory in the 6th and 7th centuries with the Britons, who were based at Dumbarton on the River Clyde. It was a struggle that the Britons seemed to lose.

Angle power was in the ascendant. In 603 they defeated Aedan, Gaelic King of Dál Riata, at the battle of Degsastan.

In 638 the Bernicians took Edinburgh from the Britons, but greater success followed under their great warlord Oswui (641 – 670). In a series of campaigns Oswui conquered Dumfriesshire, Galloway, Kyle and the Lothians. To the south he took the Angle kingdom of Deira, that covered Yorkshire, and forged a new kingdom – Northumbria.

So great was Oswui’s power that both the Picts and the Gaels recognised his overlordship. Only after the Picts defeated the Angles at Dun Nechtain (Dunnichen) in 685 AD did Northumbrian expansion halt and their overlordship was finally broken.

The power of the Angles was smashed in 867 AD when the Vikings, under Ivarr and Halfdan, took York. All of Northumbria south of the Tyne was lost. The Angles barely held on in Bamburgh, their kingly status reduced to that of an Earl. Soon the Angles, with their power depleted, looked to the new kings of Alba, like Constantine II, for protection from the Vikings in York.

In 954 Illuib, King Constantine’s son, captured Edinburgh, and Anglian power finally crumbled in Scotland when Malcolm II defeated the Northumbrians at the Battle of Carham in 1018 – taking the Scottish frontier to the Tweed.

Later Earls still played a part in Scottish history. Earl Siward helped Malcolm Canmore drive Macbeth from the kingship of Alba at the Battle of Dunsinnan – Macbeth didn’t actually die there, as is related in Shakespeare’s play, but died three years later at Lumphanan in Aberdeenshire at the hands of Malcolm Canmore.

After the Norman conquest of England, the last Anglian Earl of Northumbria decided Scotland was a safer option than England and fled to Malcolm’s court for sanctuary.

Matt Easton (you’re welcome, Matt.)

People *are* quite squishy. Yes, you can quote me on that.